A Tourist in Rome - Caracalla

Birth:April 4, 188 AD
Death:April 8, 217 AD (assassinated)
Emperor:211 AD - death

After his ascension to power alongside his brother Geta, Caracalla had the younger heir murdered, assumed sole power, and removed all traces of his brother. The removal of Geta, however, made the new Emperor unpopular and led to his villainization. These actions were typical of the brutal personality of Caracalla, which matched his stern scowling face. He instituted a reign of terror, not seen in Rome for over a century. In the footsteps of his father, Caracalla once again increased the pay and power of the army. In order to meet the increasingly high financial demands, he bestowed Roman citizenship on all the free people of the Empire (thereby allowing him to tax them.) This mixed blessing was received well by the people and bought back some of his popularity. His most notable legacy is the Baths of Caracalla. Caracalla campaigned in the east, visiting cities and temples as he went and it was in Syria that he was murdered by the Praetorian Guard while visiting a shrine.

    
Caracalla, in the Central Montemartini Museum
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Caracalla, in the courtyard of Palazzo Valentini
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Caracalla, in the Capitoline Museum
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Caracalla, in the Capitoline Museum's Hall of the Emperors
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Caracalla, in the Capitoline Museum's Hall of the Emperors
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Caracalla, in the Capitoline Museum's Hall of the Emperors
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Caracalla, in the National Museum of Rome - Palazzo Massimo
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Caracalla, in the National Museum of Rome - Palazzo Massimo
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Caracalla, in the National Museum of Rome - Baths of Diocletian
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Places in Rome to see the contributions of Caracalla: See also:
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