A Tourist in Rome - Temple of Divine Trajan

Location:No longer exists, was west of Trajan's Column
Metro:Colosseo

The Temple of Divine Trajan was erected in 121 AD by Hadrian, in honor of Trajan. Whether it stood southwest of Trajan's Column, where Santa Maria de Loreto now stands, or northwest of the column, where the 16th century Palazzo Valentini now stands, is still a matter of debate. It was huge, perhaps as large as the Basilica Ulpia in Trajan's Forum, with columns 60 feet tall on its porch. The temple has not been excavated but is shown on coins as raised on a high podium, with eight columns across the principle facade and a broad flight of stairs flanked by statues, possibly of Victory and Peace. In front, there is a large altar and, on either side of the temple, colonnades. Nothing remains today, except 7 large animal heads which were once in the temple (1st photo below), which are now in the Michelangelo Cloister of the National Museum of Rome - Terme di Diocleziano, a huge Corinthian capital and grey Egyptian granite shaft lying on the ground behind Trajan's Column, and a huge column discovered under Le Domus Romane di Palazzo Valentini.

    
Camel head and Horse head, originally from the Temple of Divine Trajan
See all Temple of Divine Trajan photos.
    
Elephant head, originally from the Temple of Divine Trajan
See all Temple of Divine Trajan photos.
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