A Tourist in Rome - Gallienus

Birth:218 AD
Death:268 AD (murdered by troops)
Emperor:253 AD - death

Gallienus was proclaimed as co-emperor with his father Valerian, following the death of Trebonianus Gallus, by their troops in Switzerland. Unusually, in a period of soldier-emperors, father and son were members of the Senatorial class in Rome. While Valerian controlled the east, Gallienus spent seven years fighting incursions in the west and creating treaties to preserve the borders, even putting down minor insurrections. When his father was killed by the Persians in 259, Gallienus became sole ruler. He granted rights to the Christians, elevated the Equestrian class to the role of Provincial governors (creating friction with the Senate), and increased the role of cavalry in the military. During his reign, the Porta Esquilina gate in the Servian Wall was rededicated to Gallienus and his wife Cornelia. Despite his strong leadership, the Empire began to fracture. In 268 AD, while on campaign in Naissus, he was murdered by senior officers in his army, including two future Emperors, Claudius II and Aurelian.

    
Gallienus, in the National Museum of Rome - Palazzo Altemps
See all Gallienus photos.
    
Gallienus, in the National Museum of Rome - Palazzo Altemps
See all Gallienus photos.
Places in Rome to see the contributions of Gallienus: See also:
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